Queens Central Library, Children’s Library Discovery Center

Jamaica, NY

2011

Completed under the auspices of the New York City Design and Construction Excellence program, the Children’s Library Discovery Center is a 22,000-square-foot, two-story addition to the existing Queens Central Library building. The glowing glass façade is a beacon in the surrounding community and is elemental in increasing the library’s visibility and reintroducing it as a central cultural and social destination. The completion of the CLDC marks the realization of the first phase of 1100 Architect’s master plan for the renovation and modernization of the 275,000-square-foot Queens Central Library.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

Queens Central Library, Children’s Library Discovery Center

Jamaica, NY

2011

Situated on a corner, the new addition takes advantage of its exposure to the street, creating a dialogue between the interior and exterior through the use of large transparent windows that allow an abundance of natural light to enter.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

To create the appearance of a glowing box, the structural curtain wall is composed of four types of glass: transparent, translucent, opaque, and textured. High-performance, insulated, glare-reducing glazing lessens the burden on the building’s heating and cooling systems.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

The CLDC was designed to be a part of the Central Library and as such has no independent exterior entrance. The interior façade, located where the CLDC meets the existing library, is treated analogous to the exterior façade and contains inhabitable niches and windows that provide views into and out of the children’s library. Lee H. Skolnick Architecture & Design Partnership designed the colorful graphics that help identify the CLDC as a special place within the larger library.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

A map of Queens designed by Lee H. Skolnick Architecture + Design Partnership is located on the floor just beyond the entry portal. It informs visitors about the rich cultural diversity of the borough, and identifies the branches of the Queens Library and major landmarks.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

The perimeter wall has been thickened to incorporate quiet reading nooks and intimate social spaces.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

The staircase acts as a sculptural element in the space and is strategically placed opposite the entrance portal to make all visitors aware that the children’s library occupies two floors and to encourage the use of stairs rather than the elevators.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

The folded planes of the acoustical plaster ceiling imbue the space with a regular rhythm and sense of scale. Openings for air distribution are incorporated into intentional gaps where the ceiling planes shift, merging a design concept with a functional requirement.

©Michael Moran/OTTO
©Michael Moran/OTTO

The sustainable design strategy for the CLDC consists of a high-performance façade, energy-efficient mechanical systems and lighting, radiant floor heating, recycled and low-emitting materials, and water conservation. Green education graphics distributed throughout the library provide information on sustainable features.

©1100 Architect

Queens Central Library, Children’s Library Discovery Center

Jamaica, NY

2011

©Michael Moran/OTTO

Completed under the auspices of the New York City Design and Construction Excellence program, the Children’s Library Discovery Center is a 22,000-square-foot, two-story addition to the existing Queens Central Library building. The glowing glass façade is a beacon in the surrounding community and is elemental in increasing the library’s visibility and reintroducing it as a central cultural and social destination. The completion of the CLDC marks the realization of the first phase of 1100 Architect’s master plan for the renovation and modernization of the 275,000-square-foot Queens Central Library.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

Situated on a corner, the new addition takes advantage of its exposure to the street, creating a dialogue between the interior and exterior through the use of large transparent windows that allow an abundance of natural light to enter.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

To create the appearance of a glowing box, the structural curtain wall is composed of four types of glass: transparent, translucent, opaque, and textured. High-performance, insulated, glare-reducing glazing lessens the burden on the building’s heating and cooling systems.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

The CLDC was designed to be a part of the Central Library and as such has no independent exterior entrance. The interior façade, located where the CLDC meets the existing library, is treated analogous to the exterior façade and contains inhabitable niches and windows that provide views into and out of the children’s library. Lee H. Skolnick Architecture & Design Partnership designed the colorful graphics that help identify the CLDC as a special place within the larger library.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

A map of Queens designed by Lee H. Skolnick Architecture + Design Partnership is located on the floor just beyond the entry portal. It informs visitors about the rich cultural diversity of the borough, and identifies the branches of the Queens Library and major landmarks.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

The perimeter wall has been thickened to incorporate quiet reading nooks and intimate social spaces.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

The staircase acts as a sculptural element in the space and is strategically placed opposite the entrance portal to make all visitors aware that the children’s library occupies two floors and to encourage the use of stairs rather than the elevators.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

The folded planes of the acoustical plaster ceiling imbue the space with a regular rhythm and sense of scale. Openings for air distribution are incorporated into intentional gaps where the ceiling planes shift, merging a design concept with a functional requirement.

©Michael Moran/OTTO
©1100 Architect

The sustainable design strategy for the CLDC consists of a high-performance façade, energy-efficient mechanical systems and lighting, radiant floor heating, recycled and low-emitting materials, and water conservation. Green education graphics distributed throughout the library provide information on sustainable features.

Share
Search
Subscribe to our Newsletter:
* indicates required

Name*


Email Address*


Company