Long Island House

Long Island, NY

2012

Situated on the eastern shore of Long Island, the design of this beach house is conceived as emerging from the landscape. The house is composed of two elements – the main house and a pavilion – that are situated on a base that extends into the landscape. From the driveway entrance on the northern side, the house appears as a largely solid, stone-clad volume with rectangular perforations for the windows. In contrast, the more private southern façade is composed almost entirely of glass to maximize ocean views and sun exposure. What initially presents itself as a classic modern box unfolds to become an unexpectedly open sculptural figure.

©Nikolas Koenig

Long Island House

Long Island, NY

2012

©Nikolas Koenig

The exterior palette of materials is derived from the beach setting; limestone is used to echo the color of the sand.

©Nikolas Koenig

Upon entering the main house, visitors encounter an open common area enclosed by glass walls that let in an abundance of natural light and provide unobstructed views out to the infinity pool, across the dunes, and to the ocean beyond.

©Nikolas Koenig

The two main staircases act as objects within the home. Influenced by and abstracted from marine imagery, they are envisioned as found objects turned up by the ocean, such as driftwood.

©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig

The living, dining, and kitchen spaces are drawn together by the sloped roof, which creates continuity by connecting the first and second floors, and opening up the first floor to a double height space.

©Nikolas Koenig

A combination of natural light from skylights and artificial lighting creates a bright and comfortable environment for family spaces located on the lower level.

©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig

The dune landscape and native plantings along the ramped portion of the green roof emphasize the visual metaphor of the house springing from the terrain.

©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig

Long Island House

Long Island, NY

2012

©Nikolas Koenig

Situated on the eastern shore of Long Island, the design of this beach house is conceived as emerging from the landscape. The house is composed of two elements – the main house and a pavilion – that are situated on a base that extends into the landscape. From the driveway entrance on the northern side, the house appears as a largely solid, stone-clad volume with rectangular perforations for the windows. In contrast, the more private southern façade is composed almost entirely of glass to maximize ocean views and sun exposure. What initially presents itself as a classic modern box unfolds to become an unexpectedly open sculptural figure.

©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig

The exterior palette of materials is derived from the beach setting; limestone is used to echo the color of the sand.

©Nikolas Koenig

Upon entering the main house, visitors encounter an open common area enclosed by glass walls that let in an abundance of natural light and provide unobstructed views out to the infinity pool, across the dunes, and to the ocean beyond.

©Nikolas Koenig

The two main staircases act as objects within the home. Influenced by and abstracted from marine imagery, they are envisioned as found objects turned up by the ocean, such as driftwood.

©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig

The living, dining, and kitchen spaces are drawn together by the sloped roof, which creates continuity by connecting the first and second floors, and opening up the first floor to a double height space.

©Nikolas Koenig

A combination of natural light from skylights and artificial lighting creates a bright and comfortable environment for family spaces located on the lower level.

©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig

The dune landscape and native plantings along the ramped portion of the green roof emphasize the visual metaphor of the house springing from the terrain.

©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
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