Irish Hunger Memorial

New York, NY

2002

Together with artist Brian Tolle and landscape architect Gail Wittwer-Laird, 1100 Architect was selected by the Battery Park City Authority to create a memorial commemorating the Great Irish Hunger. On a base of Irish limestone and illuminated glass, the team re-created a rugged landscape comprised of abandoned potato fields, various species of native Irish plants, and walls made of stones from each of Ireland’s 32 counties. From the base’s west side, visitors enter and ascend through a passageway that opens into a ruined famine-era cottage.  Leaving the cottage, visitors may wander through the fields and overgrown potato furrows. The landscape cantilevers boldly beyond its base, suggesting the courageous journey made by Irish émigrés to America. Text inserted into the glass strata of this platform recounts the history of the Hunger and encourages visitors to become actively engaged in meeting the current challenge of world hunger.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Irish Hunger Memorial

New York, NY

2002

During the Great Irish Famine (1845-50), approximately 12% of Ireland’s population died, and 15% emigrated from the island, many coming to the United States. The Irish Hunger Memorial commemorates these events by guiding the visitor through a process of learning, emotional reaction, and reflection.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

The base for the landscape is an illuminated stone and glass structure that rises from street level at the southeastern corner to a height of twenty-five feet at the western end. The highest point of the cantilevered landscape offers views of the Hudson River, the Statue of Liberty, and Ellis Island, connecting the memorial to nearby landmarks.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

The memorial juxtaposes rural and urban, as well as historic and modern elements.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

A ruined famine-era cottage from County Mayo in Ireland, donated to the project by the Slack family, is accessed from two paths, one that meanders across the landscape and another that connects diagonally through the base. This roofless structure recalls the desperate farmers who tore the thatch off their homes in order to prove destitution, and qualify for famine relief.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

The base is inscribed with texts that recount the history of the Irish Hunger alongside stories of other world hunger issues past and present.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Text is inserted behind the panels rather than inscribed directly onto the glass, allowing the text to be easily updated. Over time, as texts are changed the landscape of the monument will change as well. The monument is thus a living, evolving document that actively encourages visitors to meet the challenge of world hunger.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

A contemplative space where visitors explore the famine and its connections to world hunger today, the memorial ultimately aims to effect social change.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Publications

Bevan, Robert. “Out of the Ashes: The Legacy of 9/11.” The Art Newspaper, September 2011.

Quartino, Daniela Santos, ed. New York Architecture. Barcelona: Loft Publications, 2010.

Vidiella, Àlex Sánchez. The Sourcebook of Contemporary Architecture. New York: Collins Design, 2007.

Fuchigami, Masayuki. A Guide to Contemporary Architecture in America, Volume 2: Eastern USA. Tokyo: TOTO Shuppan, 2006.

Stern, Robert A.M., David Fishman, and Jacob Tilove. New York 2000. New York: The Monacelli Press, 2006.

Oriol, Anja Llorella, ed. Ultimate New York Design. Madrid: teNeues, 2006.

“The Irish Hunger Memorial, Battery Park City, New York.” Dialogue, November 2004.

Bulthaup, Gerd, ed. Perspectives. Hamburg: Hoffmann und Campe Verlag GmbH, 2004.

Davidson, Cynthia. “Irish Hunger Memorial.” Architectural Record, July 2003.

Kubiak, Meike. “Raue Landschaft.” Deutsche BauZeitschrift, May 2003.

Kay, Jane Holtz. “A Hunger for Memorials.” Landscape Architecture, March 2003.

“1100 Architect, The Irish Hunger Memorial.” Architecture and Urbanism, March 2003.

D’Arcy, David. “The Trail of Tears: Memorials Multiply.” The Art Newspaper, March 2003.

Dillon, David. “Memory of Want.” The Dallas Morning News, February 12, 2003.

Nobel, Philip. “Going Hungry.” Metropolis, November 2002.

Ryan, Zoe. “Human Nature.” Take the R Train / Van Alen Report, August 13, 2002.

Saltonstall, David. “Irish Memorial is Unveiled.” Daily News, July 17, 2002.

Gardner, James. “Irish Famine Memorial Opens.” NY Sun, July 16, 2002.

Smith, Roberta. “A Memorial Remembers the Hungry.” The New York Times, July 16, 2002.

Dunlap, David W. “New Melting Pot of Museums Downtown.” The New York Times, August 5, 2001.

Hearns, Orla. “Mayo Famine Cottage for US Memorial Site.” Western People, June 6, 2001.

Kaizen, William R. “Brian Tolle.” BOMB, Summer 2001.

“A Wee Bit of Irish Countryside for New York.” Architectural Record, May 2001.

Saul, Michael. “Irish Famine Memorial Begun.” The Daily News, March 16, 2001.

Dunlap, David W. “Memorial to the Hunger, Complete With Old Sod.” The New York Times, March 15, 2001.

Related News

Similar Projects

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Irish Hunger Memorial

New York, NY

2002

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Together with artist Brian Tolle and landscape architect Gail Wittwer-Laird, 1100 Architect was selected by the Battery Park City Authority to create a memorial commemorating the Great Irish Hunger. On a base of Irish limestone and illuminated glass, the team re-created a rugged landscape comprised of abandoned potato fields, various species of native Irish plants, and walls made of stones from each of Ireland’s 32 counties. From the base’s west side, visitors enter and ascend through a passageway that opens into a ruined famine-era cottage.  Leaving the cottage, visitors may wander through the fields and overgrown potato furrows. The landscape cantilevers boldly beyond its base, suggesting the courageous journey made by Irish émigrés to America. Text inserted into the glass strata of this platform recounts the history of the Hunger and encourages visitors to become actively engaged in meeting the current challenge of world hunger.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

During the Great Irish Famine (1845-50), approximately 12% of Ireland’s population died, and 15% emigrated from the island, many coming to the United States. The Irish Hunger Memorial commemorates these events by guiding the visitor through a process of learning, emotional reaction, and reflection.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

The base for the landscape is an illuminated stone and glass structure that rises from street level at the southeastern corner to a height of twenty-five feet at the western end. The highest point of the cantilevered landscape offers views of the Hudson River, the Statue of Liberty, and Ellis Island, connecting the memorial to nearby landmarks.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

The memorial juxtaposes rural and urban, as well as historic and modern elements.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

A ruined famine-era cottage from County Mayo in Ireland, donated to the project by the Slack family, is accessed from two paths, one that meanders across the landscape and another that connects diagonally through the base. This roofless structure recalls the desperate farmers who tore the thatch off their homes in order to prove destitution, and qualify for famine relief.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

The base is inscribed with texts that recount the history of the Irish Hunger alongside stories of other world hunger issues past and present.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Text is inserted behind the panels rather than inscribed directly onto the glass, allowing the text to be easily updated. Over time, as texts are changed the landscape of the monument will change as well. The monument is thus a living, evolving document that actively encourages visitors to meet the challenge of world hunger.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

A contemplative space where visitors explore the famine and its connections to world hunger today, the memorial ultimately aims to effect social change.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Publications

Bevan, Robert. “Out of the Ashes: The Legacy of 9/11.” The Art Newspaper, September 2011.

Quartino, Daniela Santos, ed. New York Architecture. Barcelona: Loft Publications, 2010.

Vidiella, Àlex Sánchez. The Sourcebook of Contemporary Architecture. New York: Collins Design, 2007.

Fuchigami, Masayuki. A Guide to Contemporary Architecture in America, Volume 2: Eastern USA. Tokyo: TOTO Shuppan, 2006.

Stern, Robert A.M., David Fishman, and Jacob Tilove. New York 2000. New York: The Monacelli Press, 2006.

Oriol, Anja Llorella, ed. Ultimate New York Design. Madrid: teNeues, 2006.

“The Irish Hunger Memorial, Battery Park City, New York.” Dialogue, November 2004.

Bulthaup, Gerd, ed. Perspectives. Hamburg: Hoffmann und Campe Verlag GmbH, 2004.

Davidson, Cynthia. “Irish Hunger Memorial.” Architectural Record, July 2003.

Kubiak, Meike. “Raue Landschaft.” Deutsche BauZeitschrift, May 2003.

Kay, Jane Holtz. “A Hunger for Memorials.” Landscape Architecture, March 2003.

“1100 Architect, The Irish Hunger Memorial.” Architecture and Urbanism, March 2003.

D’Arcy, David. “The Trail of Tears: Memorials Multiply.” The Art Newspaper, March 2003.

Dillon, David. “Memory of Want.” The Dallas Morning News, February 12, 2003.

Nobel, Philip. “Going Hungry.” Metropolis, November 2002.

Ryan, Zoe. “Human Nature.” Take the R Train / Van Alen Report, August 13, 2002.

Saltonstall, David. “Irish Memorial is Unveiled.” Daily News, July 17, 2002.

Gardner, James. “Irish Famine Memorial Opens.” NY Sun, July 16, 2002.

Smith, Roberta. “A Memorial Remembers the Hungry.” The New York Times, July 16, 2002.

Dunlap, David W. “New Melting Pot of Museums Downtown.” The New York Times, August 5, 2001.

Hearns, Orla. “Mayo Famine Cottage for US Memorial Site.” Western People, June 6, 2001.

Kaizen, William R. “Brian Tolle.” BOMB, Summer 2001.

“A Wee Bit of Irish Countryside for New York.” Architectural Record, May 2001.

Saul, Michael. “Irish Famine Memorial Begun.” The Daily News, March 16, 2001.

Dunlap, David W. “Memorial to the Hunger, Complete With Old Sod.” The New York Times, March 15, 2001.

Related News

Similar Projects

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