East Side Penthouse

New York, NY

2002

1100 transformed this previously ornate midtown penthouse into a striking minimalist space that reflects the modern style of the inhabitants. Every decision underlines the clients’ pop art sensibility, influenced by the artists they admire and whose work they collect: Warhol, Riley, Lichtenstein, and others. Basic geometric shapes, repeated in a variety of materials and in the furniture, echo the simple forms of the art. Hard polished surfaces – marble agglomerate floors, lacquer, stainless steel, glass, and plastic – reflect light and create a sleek, glowing environment. In the living spaces walls arc into ceilings, blurring boundaries and creating continuous, infinite spaces. Narrow hallways open into large foyers and rooms, and a spacious kitchen occupies the center of the apartment. If pop art calls attention to the visual impact of an image, then this home fulfills a desire to penetrate that image and enter its world.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

East Side Penthouse

New York, NY

2002

One of the unique features of the apartment is the 40-foot wide living room with large windows that provide views of the 59th Street Bridge. The furniture layout for this space was inspired by conversation pits of the 1960s.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO

The architecture, art collection, and furniture work together to create a bold, seamless space that illustrates the pop art penchant of the client.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO

The palette of materials in the luminous, sculpted spaces is spare and not conventionally luxurious: marble-based epoxy, stainless and hot-rolled steel, plaster, acrylic, and painted wood.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Publications

Mascheroni, Monica. “Welcome to the Future.” Wohn! Design, January / February 2012.

“Pop Culture.” Vogue, November 2006.

Yelavich, Susan. Contemporary World Interiors. New York: Phaidon Press Limited, 2007.

Henzshel, Yorg. “Pop-Mechanics.” Architectural Digest (Russian Edition), July/August 2004.

Sueyoshi, Hiroko. “The Residence in Manhattan.” Sumau, November 2003.

Hantzschel, Jorg. “Kinder des Pop.” AD Germany, September 2003.

Colontonio, Allex. “A Pop Era.” Casa Vogue (Brazil Edition), Fall 2003. 

Bernstein, Fred. “2003: A Space Odyssey.” Interior Design, January 2003.

Bowles, Hamish. “Planet Perry.” Vogue, September 2002.

Similar Projects

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

East Side Penthouse

New York, NY

2002

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

1100 transformed this previously ornate midtown penthouse into a striking minimalist space that reflects the modern style of the inhabitants. Every decision underlines the clients’ pop art sensibility, influenced by the artists they admire and whose work they collect: Warhol, Riley, Lichtenstein, and others. Basic geometric shapes, repeated in a variety of materials and in the furniture, echo the simple forms of the art. Hard polished surfaces – marble agglomerate floors, lacquer, stainless steel, glass, and plastic – reflect light and create a sleek, glowing environment. In the living spaces walls arc into ceilings, blurring boundaries and creating continuous, infinite spaces. Narrow hallways open into large foyers and rooms, and a spacious kitchen occupies the center of the apartment. If pop art calls attention to the visual impact of an image, then this home fulfills a desire to penetrate that image and enter its world.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

One of the unique features of the apartment is the 40-foot wide living room with large windows that provide views of the 59th Street Bridge. The furniture layout for this space was inspired by conversation pits of the 1960s.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO

The architecture, art collection, and furniture work together to create a bold, seamless space that illustrates the pop art penchant of the client.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO

The palette of materials in the luminous, sculpted spaces is spare and not conventionally luxurious: marble-based epoxy, stainless and hot-rolled steel, plaster, acrylic, and painted wood.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Publications

Mascheroni, Monica. “Welcome to the Future.” Wohn! Design, January / February 2012.

“Pop Culture.” Vogue, November 2006.

Yelavich, Susan. Contemporary World Interiors. New York: Phaidon Press Limited, 2007.

Henzshel, Yorg. “Pop-Mechanics.” Architectural Digest (Russian Edition), July/August 2004.

Sueyoshi, Hiroko. “The Residence in Manhattan.” Sumau, November 2003.

Hantzschel, Jorg. “Kinder des Pop.” AD Germany, September 2003.

Colontonio, Allex. “A Pop Era.” Casa Vogue (Brazil Edition), Fall 2003. 

Bernstein, Fred. “2003: A Space Odyssey.” Interior Design, January 2003.

Bowles, Hamish. “Planet Perry.” Vogue, September 2002.

Similar Projects

Share
Search
Subscribe to our Newsletter:
* indicates required

Name*


Email Address*


Company