New York University, Department of Linguistics Building

New York, NY

2009

Our design for the reconstruction of NYU’s Department of Linguistics transforms a turn-of-the-twentieth-century, multi-story manufacturing building into a cohesive, vibrant academic facility. The redesign improves communication between the five divisions of the department and gives the program a larger public presence in the University. The first floor is now an inviting public space with a generous reception area, student lounge, and two lecture rooms that are directly visible from the street. The design of each of the four upper stories encourages collaboration by locating lounges and teaching labs at the center of the space and surrounding them with student and faculty offices. The large, movable glass walls of the lounges allow for the expansion of the laboratory environments when needed. To improve the building’s sustainability, we used recycled materials, increased the amount of natural light that enters, and introduced energy efficient lighting and HVAC systems.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

New York University, Department of Linguistics Building

New York, NY

2009

The building was constructed in 1900 with many of the iconic elements characteristic of nineteenth-century New York City lofts. 1100 preserved many of the existing features, such as the iron columns and exposed brick walls, and juxtaposed them with modern materials like glass and metal to give the spaces a contemporary feel.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

On the first floor, large storefront-like windows create a connection between the interior and the exterior, and increase awareness of the department’s activities among members of the University and surrounding community.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

A prominent staircase in the entrance foyer connects the first and second floors; its modern, open design encourages visitors to walk up the stairs instead of using an elevator.

©Michael Moran/OTTO
©Michael Moran/OTTO
©Michael Moran/OTTO

Student and faculty offices were relocated to the north and south ends of each of the upper floors, taking advantage of the influx of natural light and greater privacy.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

Common spaces are at the center of the floor to provide opportunities for students, faculty, and staff to interact in unexpected ways.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

The use of sliding glass walls for the offices and teaching labs creates flexible spaces that can open up to accommodate various group sizes and functions.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

Many sustainable features were incorporated into the building as part of the renovation. Every effort was made to increase the amount of natural light into the building including the removal of the hung ceiling in some areas. To supplement the natural light from the large windows on the north and south facades and the sixth floor skylight, an automated lighting system was installed to control the energy-efficient artificial lights. We also added an energy-efficient HVAC system and used recycled materials.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

To further encourage exchanges between the divisions located on different floors, we updated the existing fire stairs with new lighting, playful signage, and artistically-designed railings to make traveling from floor to floor an easier and more pleasant experience. The graphics change color depending on the direction from which they are viewed – blue if you are climbing up the stairs and red if you are walking down.

©Michael Moran/OTTO
©Michael Moran/OTTO

New York University, Department of Linguistics Building

New York, NY

2009

©Michael Moran/OTTO

Our design for the reconstruction of NYU’s Department of Linguistics transforms a turn-of-the-twentieth-century, multi-story manufacturing building into a cohesive, vibrant academic facility. The redesign improves communication between the five divisions of the department and gives the program a larger public presence in the University. The first floor is now an inviting public space with a generous reception area, student lounge, and two lecture rooms that are directly visible from the street. The design of each of the four upper stories encourages collaboration by locating lounges and teaching labs at the center of the space and surrounding them with student and faculty offices. The large, movable glass walls of the lounges allow for the expansion of the laboratory environments when needed. To improve the building’s sustainability, we used recycled materials, increased the amount of natural light that enters, and introduced energy efficient lighting and HVAC systems.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

The building was constructed in 1900 with many of the iconic elements characteristic of nineteenth-century New York City lofts. 1100 preserved many of the existing features, such as the iron columns and exposed brick walls, and juxtaposed them with modern materials like glass and metal to give the spaces a contemporary feel.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

On the first floor, large storefront-like windows create a connection between the interior and the exterior, and increase awareness of the department’s activities among members of the University and surrounding community.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

A prominent staircase in the entrance foyer connects the first and second floors; its modern, open design encourages visitors to walk up the stairs instead of using an elevator.

©Michael Moran/OTTO
©Michael Moran/OTTO
©Michael Moran/OTTO

Student and faculty offices were relocated to the north and south ends of each of the upper floors, taking advantage of the influx of natural light and greater privacy.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

Common spaces are at the center of the floor to provide opportunities for students, faculty, and staff to interact in unexpected ways.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

The use of sliding glass walls for the offices and teaching labs creates flexible spaces that can open up to accommodate various group sizes and functions.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

Many sustainable features were incorporated into the building as part of the renovation. Every effort was made to increase the amount of natural light into the building including the removal of the hung ceiling in some areas. To supplement the natural light from the large windows on the north and south facades and the sixth floor skylight, an automated lighting system was installed to control the energy-efficient artificial lights. We also added an energy-efficient HVAC system and used recycled materials.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

To further encourage exchanges between the divisions located on different floors, we updated the existing fire stairs with new lighting, playful signage, and artistically-designed railings to make traveling from floor to floor an easier and more pleasant experience. The graphics change color depending on the direction from which they are viewed – blue if you are climbing up the stairs and red if you are walking down.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

Publications

Meinhold, Bridgette. “1100 Architect Renovates NYU’s Department of Linguistics Into a Vibrant Naturally Lit Space.” Inhabitat, October 4, 2011.

Allen, Cindy, ed. Interior Design Best of Year. Boca Raton, FL: Sandow Media, 2011.

“Best of Year: NYU Department of Linguistics.” Interior Design, December 2010.

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