Hudson River House

Putnam County, NY

2010

This three-story, 7,400-square-foot single family home is situated on a sloping site in the Hudson River Valley. The design of this modern home was guided by its immediate surroundings – both the vistas provided by its perch above the Hudson River and the geological strata of the land. The shifting volumes created by this concept allow for terraced areas that present stunning views of the river and the heavily forested land surrounding the property. The rhythm and feeling of the exterior is expressed on the interior through the modular patterns in the built-in cabinetry, the shifting planes of the fireplaces, and the vertical striations in the wood floors and staircase. The house is designed to flexibly respond to shifts in climate over the course of the four seasons – it opens up to catch natural breezes in the summer, and is closed and warm in the winter.

©Nikolas Koenig

Hudson River House

Putnam County, NY

2010

©Nikolas Koenig

The gray tones of local Schist stone set the color palette for the façade, which is composed of two shades of Swisspearl cement fiberboard panels. These panels together with bands of windows and sliding glass doors create a surface pattern of interlocking elements that reinforce the geometry of the house.

©Nikolas Koenig

A Swisspearl rain screen promotes sustainability through its prevention of water absorption into the exterior walls. By extending façade panels out from the support walls of the structure, this cladding system creates a ventilated façade with a porous outer surface that allows airflow behind and around each panel. As a result, forces that typically propel rainwater into the wall are diminished. Vents are positioned at the top and bottom of the wall, helping moisture to quickly drain away or evaporate. In addition, a drainage layer further protects the support wall.

©Nikolas Koenig

The rhythm and feeling of the exterior is expressed on the interior through the modular patterns in the built-in cabinetry, the shifting planes of the fireplaces, and the vertical striations in the wood floors and staircase.

©Nikolas Koenig

The open plan interior was driven by the clients’ desire for informality reminiscent of a loft setting. Sliding glass doors and a double-height atrium in the main living space enhance this feeling of openness and allow airflow through the house.

©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig

The primary source of cooling for the home is natural ventilation. Through various openings, including sliding doors and casements, as well as the large central atrium with operable clerestory windows, air is encouraged to flow naturally throughout the house. Additional cooling and heating are provided by a geothermal heat pump system with closed loop ground wells. In the summer, the geothermal pump also heats the pool and hot tub with extracted heat. Radiant floor heating further controls the interior temperature of the home.

©1100 Architect

Publications

Bodenbach, Christof. “Bauen Für Stadt, Land, Fluss.” Häuser, April / May 2012.

Beetschen, Mirko. “Shifts of Grey.” Swisspearl Architecture, October 2010.

Similar Projects

©Nikolas Koenig

Hudson River House

Putnam County, NY

2010

©Nikolas Koenig

This three-story, 7,400-square-foot single family home is situated on a sloping site in the Hudson River Valley. The design of this modern home was guided by its immediate surroundings – both the vistas provided by its perch above the Hudson River and the geological strata of the land. The shifting volumes created by this concept allow for terraced areas that present stunning views of the river and the heavily forested land surrounding the property. The rhythm and feeling of the exterior is expressed on the interior through the modular patterns in the built-in cabinetry, the shifting planes of the fireplaces, and the vertical striations in the wood floors and staircase. The house is designed to flexibly respond to shifts in climate over the course of the four seasons – it opens up to catch natural breezes in the summer, and is closed and warm in the winter.

©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig

The gray tones of local Schist stone set the color palette for the façade, which is composed of two shades of Swisspearl cement fiberboard panels. These panels together with bands of windows and sliding glass doors create a surface pattern of interlocking elements that reinforce the geometry of the house.

©Nikolas Koenig

A Swisspearl rain screen promotes sustainability through its prevention of water absorption into the exterior walls. By extending façade panels out from the support walls of the structure, this cladding system creates a ventilated façade with a porous outer surface that allows airflow behind and around each panel. As a result, forces that typically propel rainwater into the wall are diminished. Vents are positioned at the top and bottom of the wall, helping moisture to quickly drain away or evaporate. In addition, a drainage layer further protects the support wall.

©Nikolas Koenig

The rhythm and feeling of the exterior is expressed on the interior through the modular patterns in the built-in cabinetry, the shifting planes of the fireplaces, and the vertical striations in the wood floors and staircase.

©Nikolas Koenig

The open plan interior was driven by the clients’ desire for informality reminiscent of a loft setting. Sliding glass doors and a double-height atrium in the main living space enhance this feeling of openness and allow airflow through the house.

©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©Nikolas Koenig
©1100 Architect

The primary source of cooling for the home is natural ventilation. Through various openings, including sliding doors and casements, as well as the large central atrium with operable clerestory windows, air is encouraged to flow naturally throughout the house. Additional cooling and heating are provided by a geothermal heat pump system with closed loop ground wells. In the summer, the geothermal pump also heats the pool and hot tub with extracted heat. Radiant floor heating further controls the interior temperature of the home.

©Nikolas Koenig

Publications

Bodenbach, Christof. “Bauen Für Stadt, Land, Fluss.” Häuser, April / May 2012.

Beetschen, Mirko. “Shifts of Grey.” Swisspearl Architecture, October 2010.

Similar Projects

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