Harrison Street Townhouse

New York, NY

2005

A complete reconstruction and transformation was undertaken for this small historic building in Tribeca, originally constructed in 1919. The glazed terra-cotta exterior cladding, in considerable disrepair, was restored to the standards of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, while the interior was entirely rebuilt into three levels of living space, including a rooftop addition. Expansive windows enhance the perceptual size of the limited interior area by inviting filtered sunlight into the home. The diffuse glow complements a rich selection of wood, stone, and marble. A cantilevered glass staircase, slightly veiled by a floor-to-ceiling bronze screen, ushers light into the core of the residence.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

Harrison Street Townhouse

New York, NY

2005

©Michael Moran/OTTO

A built-in handrail adds a fresh, fluid component to an otherwise traditional staircase.

©Michael Moran/OTTO
©Michael Moran/OTTO
©Michael Moran/OTTO

Cantilevered glass stairs connecting the third floor and the penthouse are offset by a floor-to-ceiling bronze screen.

©Michael Moran/OTTO
©Michael Moran/OTTO

A penthouse, consisting of compound curved glass walls and a cantilevered roof, crowns the building. Set back from the roof’s edge, it is barely visible from the street.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

The travertine floor extends from the interior of the penthouse onto the roof deck to create continuity between the spaces.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

Publications

Galindo, Michelle, ed. 1000x Architecture of the Americas. Berlin, Germany: Verlagshaus Braun, 2008.

Leone, Catherine Warren. “Tribeca Light.” New York Spaces, November 2007.

Similar Projects

©Michael Moran/OTTO

Harrison Street Townhouse

New York, NY

2005

©Michael Moran/OTTO

A complete reconstruction and transformation was undertaken for this small historic building in Tribeca, originally constructed in 1919. The glazed terra-cotta exterior cladding, in considerable disrepair, was restored to the standards of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, while the interior was entirely rebuilt into three levels of living space, including a rooftop addition. Expansive windows enhance the perceptual size of the limited interior area by inviting filtered sunlight into the home. The diffuse glow complements a rich selection of wood, stone, and marble. A cantilevered glass staircase, slightly veiled by a floor-to-ceiling bronze screen, ushers light into the core of the residence.

©Michael Moran/OTTO
©Michael Moran/OTTO

A built-in handrail adds a fresh, fluid component to an otherwise traditional staircase.

©Michael Moran/OTTO
©Michael Moran/OTTO
©Michael Moran/OTTO

Cantilevered glass stairs connecting the third floor and the penthouse are offset by a floor-to-ceiling bronze screen.

©Michael Moran/OTTO
©Michael Moran/OTTO

A penthouse, consisting of compound curved glass walls and a cantilevered roof, crowns the building. Set back from the roof’s edge, it is barely visible from the street.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

The travertine floor extends from the interior of the penthouse onto the roof deck to create continuity between the spaces.

©Michael Moran/OTTO

Publications

Galindo, Michelle, ed. 1000x Architecture of the Americas. Berlin, Germany: Verlagshaus Braun, 2008.

Leone, Catherine Warren. “Tribeca Light.” New York Spaces, November 2007.

Similar Projects

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