Carriage House

New York, NY

2003

In this complete renovation of a Greenwich Village carriage house, 1100 created an interior that is open, warm, and modern. Cleanly composed of white walls, dark-stained oak floors, and sycamore paneling, the space comfortably facilitates entertaining and also accommodates the clients’ extensive art and furniture collections. Linked by a ribbon-like switchback staircase made of tinted cast concrete, the three-and-a-half levels include a state-of-the-art entertainment center, wine cellar, guestroom, master bedroom suite, and roof terrace.

The building was originally constructed as a carriage house for one of the grand nineteenth-century homes on Washington Square and then converted into a glassblowing studio in the early twentieth century. The building was in complete disrepair prior to our rehabilitation of the façade, which won recognition from the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Carriage House

New York, NY

2003

With a high ceiling and two large windows overlooking the mews, the second level provides a serene space to display the client’s painting collection.The original 1890s skylight was replaced with an interactive light installation by artist James Turrell. Made of layers of white fabric and colored neon tubes, the installation responds to the changing color of the sky, slowly shifting from blue to violet over the course of the day.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Rich cinnabar red bookcases, redolent of nineteenth-century Japanese lacquer boxes, are concealed behind walnut sliding panels.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO

To bring light into the back half of the building, we set large structural glass tiles into the roof; this allows natural light to filter into the master bathroom and the stairwell.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Additions to the building were prohibited by New York City’s preservation commission, so we constructed a new level by underpinning the structure and excavating a full basement. On this level, the entertainment area’s comfortable seating easily accommodates small groups for screenings.  The room shares the floor with a walk-in wine closet and bar.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Publications

Rus, Mayer. “Pushing the Envelope.” House & Garden, December 2006.

Jacobs, Kate. “Show Home.” Elle Décor (UK Edition), November 2004.

Sueyoshi, Hiroko. “The Residence in Manhattan.” Sumau, November 2003.

Similar Projects

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Carriage House

New York, NY

2003

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

In this complete renovation of a Greenwich Village carriage house, 1100 created an interior that is open, warm, and modern. Cleanly composed of white walls, dark-stained oak floors, and sycamore paneling, the space comfortably facilitates entertaining and also accommodates the clients’ extensive art and furniture collections. Linked by a ribbon-like switchback staircase made of tinted cast concrete, the three-and-a-half levels include a state-of-the-art entertainment center, wine cellar, guestroom, master bedroom suite, and roof terrace.

The building was originally constructed as a carriage house for one of the grand nineteenth-century homes on Washington Square and then converted into a glassblowing studio in the early twentieth century. The building was in complete disrepair prior to our rehabilitation of the façade, which won recognition from the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

With a high ceiling and two large windows overlooking the mews, the second level provides a serene space to display the client’s painting collection.The original 1890s skylight was replaced with an interactive light installation by artist James Turrell. Made of layers of white fabric and colored neon tubes, the installation responds to the changing color of the sky, slowly shifting from blue to violet over the course of the day.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Rich cinnabar red bookcases, redolent of nineteenth-century Japanese lacquer boxes, are concealed behind walnut sliding panels.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO
©Peter Aaron/OTTO

To bring light into the back half of the building, we set large structural glass tiles into the roof; this allows natural light to filter into the master bathroom and the stairwell.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Additions to the building were prohibited by New York City’s preservation commission, so we constructed a new level by underpinning the structure and excavating a full basement. On this level, the entertainment area’s comfortable seating easily accommodates small groups for screenings.  The room shares the floor with a walk-in wine closet and bar.

©Peter Aaron/OTTO

Publications

Rus, Mayer. “Pushing the Envelope.” House & Garden, December 2006.

Jacobs, Kate. “Show Home.” Elle Décor (UK Edition), November 2004.

Sueyoshi, Hiroko. “The Residence in Manhattan.” Sumau, November 2003.

Similar Projects

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